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American Heritage

  1. Know What You Are Celebrating

    [caption id="attachment_221" align="alignleft" width="381"]American Flag American Flag. 4th of July City Decoration. Vintage Grading.[/caption]

    On the heels of Memorial Day, many people take the opportunity to post sentiments on social media about the true meaning of the holiday. Usually the three day weekend is an opportunity to get outside for cookouts, picnics, fireworks and just spending time with friends. But what are we celebrating?

    With the bevy of posts on social media about supporting the veterans (always a great cause, without the need for a holiday to do so), it seems people have forgotten what the difference is between Memorial Day and Veterans Day. Both are related to the military, and they both are symbolized by the

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  2. Observing National Flag Day

    american-flag-825730_1280While the Fourth of July and Memorial Day Weekend may receive almost all of the patriotic glory, so to speak, one particular holiday remains consistently overlooked yet universally beloved: Flag Day.

    Celebrated annually on June 14th, and officially established as a national day of recognition by President Woodrow Wilson in 1916, the day commemorates the official adoption of the American flag on June 14, 1777, by a resolution passed by the Second Continental Congress. (The U.S. Army celebrates the Army’s birthday on this day as well.)

    Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW), Scouts, 4-H groups, and

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  3. The National Flag: A Patriotic Symbol

    american-flag-795305_1280Brief History of the Flag

    The American flag has long been a symbol of the values held by our Founding Fathers: life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Betsy Ross, a widowed seamstress living in Philadelphia, created the first flag for all of the colonies in May 1776 at the urging of General George Washington and several other members of the Continental Congress.

    The flag was hand sewn just two months before the colonies declared independence from Great Britain and the crown. Prior to that time, various colonies and militias had used their own flags, ranging in design from the Rattlesnake Flag with its infamous “don’t tread on me” to those

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  4. What a Flag Can Do for You

    Tus-flag-car-window-flag_415_3he American flag in its current form (50 stars and 13 stripes) has been around since July 4, 1960. In 2007, it became the longest lasting version of the United States flag ever flown. While the American flag is one of the best known and most identifiable images in the world, flags themselves come in many different shapes, sizes, colors, and meanings. Best of all, flags can have an amazing impact on your life.

    Flags are versatile and can promote your organization or event in a way that no other form of marketing or advertising can. From public image and brand awareness, flags display the confidence you have in your product or service. Why else does every major business or brand utilize flags and banners?

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  5. The Controversial Green Mountain Boys

     Green Mountain Boys Flag The American Revolution was a turbulent time for a new nation on the verge of being born. Settlers who had come here to escape the oppression of England's royal rule banded together to fight for freedom, to establish a new republic in which all men are created equal. To unite the people, creating a feeling of belonging, pride, and patriotism, flags were flown for various purposes and over clusters of militia.

    Who Were the Green Mountain Boys

    One such militia consisted of the Green Mountain Boys, a group of settlers and land speculators who controlled the area called the New Hampshire Grants, located between the Connecticut River and Lake Champlain, what we know today as Vermont. Technically, they were under the control of New York, a decision made by the British;
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  6. Moon's Glory

    American Flag on the Moon Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin planted an American flag on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission. But where did it come from? There are a few theories, but ultimately no one seems to know for certain. Dolores Black, a former seamstress for a flag company in Milwaukee, thinks she may have sewn it. She stated during an interview that she had sewn her name inside the webbing that would have been used to attach the flag to a pole. Unfortunately, that webbing and the manufacturer's labels had to be removed in order to affix the flag to its aluminum pole, so even were someone to launch a multi-billion dollar operation to inspect it, there is no way to verify her assertion. According to NASA itself, the flag was purchased off-the-shelf,
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  7. Nancy Reagan: Actress, First Lady, and Honorable Wife

    Nancy ReaganThe wife of the President of the United States of America is known as the First Lady. Many notable women have contributed to our great nation just as much as their husbands. Nancy Reagan, who recently passed away on March 6, 2016, is one of the top first ladies of the 20th century. She is known for being the wife of President Ronald Reagan, for her acting credits, and for her passion about discouraging drug use by youth. She was born in New York City to actress Edith Luckett and salesman Kenneth Robbins. Anne Frances “Nancy” Robbins entered the world on July 6, 1921. Shortly after birth, her parents separated, so Nancy went to live with her aunt and uncle in Maryland. Her mother pursued her acting career and later married Chicago neurosurgeon Loyal Davis when Nancy was about eight years old. Because
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