Military History and Flags

  1. POW/MIA Flag: History and Significance

    POW-MIA flag graphic "you are not forgotten" The United States Armed Forces have engaged in countless battles in defense of the freedom so many of us take for granted. We see coverage of the devastation of war on the news but rarely see information on the members of the military who are captured or missing during these conflicts.
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  2. The Flag of the U.S. Army

    Since the 1700s, the United States Army has been an extremely valuable and necessary part of the United States of America. The Army’s principal duty is to fight in military occupation as well as battles occurring on land.

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  3. Semaphore Flags

    11949934001267935583semaphore_positions.svg.medDid that get your attention? It should have, because that motion with the flags in that position is the internationally designated semaphore signal for “Attention!” It also means “Error,” but we can skip that for now.

    Semaphore flags are the end result of a signaling system developed in the late 1600s by Robert Hooke (of microscope fame). He presented it to the Royal Society, but they failed to do anything with it. A century later, it was adapted and used by Claude Chappe in France,

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  4. You Are Not Forgotten

    2000px-United_States_POW-MIA_flag.svgIn rear windows, on motorcycles, flying on flag poles in front of businesses and homes, the POW-MIA flag has become an iconic symbol in America for the nation's concern for military personnel missing and unaccounted for in foreign wars. The idea for such a flag was first thought of by Mary Helen Hoff, wife of Navy pilot Lieutenant Commander Michael Hoff who had been missing in action in Vietnam since January 7, 1970.

    Hoff was a member of the National League of POW/MIA Families, an organization whose sole mission is “to obtain the release of all prisoners, the fullest possible accounting for the missing, and repatriation

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  5. The Controversial Green Mountain Boys

     Green Mountain Boys Flag The American Revolution was a turbulent time for a new nation on the verge of being born. Settlers who had come here to escape the oppression of England's royal rule banded together to fight for freedom, to establish a new republic in which all men are created equal. To unite the people, creating a feeling of belonging, pride, and patriotism, flags were flown for various purposes and over clusters of militia.

    Who Were the Green Mountain Boys

    One such militia consisted of the Green Mountain Boys, a group of settlers and land speculators who controlled the area called the New Hampshire Grants, located between the Connecticut River and Lake Champlain, what we know today as Vermont. Technically, they were under the control of New York, a decision made by the British;
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  6. Honor and Glory: The Standard Bearer

    Battle Flag Flags have long delineated who we are as individuals, what groups we belong to, and what we want to claim as our own. The brilliant colors and strange menageries found on banners are their own language, for flags were meant for communication before literacy was common. In the less civilized days of our past, the designs on flags gave travelers, soldiers, and common folk basic information about the areas they were living in or traveling through. At the very apex of these communications, flags were the ones used in battle. Any given army or unit would be identified by their ensign from afar, and the most vital (and dangerous) job on the field was the standard bearer. An unusual position of honor, the person chosen to carry the flag for his army had to be an extraordinary one, for he was the primary target for
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